Multitudinous identities: a qualitative and network analysis of the 15M collective identity

Some time ago I published a paper with Arnau Monterde, Antonio Calleja-López, Xabier Barandiaran y John Postill about collective identities in the 15M and related networked movements. We argue that the 15M movement  in  Spain  demands conceptual and methodological innovations. Its rapid emergence, endurance, diversity, multifaceted development and adaptive capacity, posit numerous theoretical and methodological challenges. We show how the use of structural and dynamic analysis of interaction networks (in combination with qualitative data) is a valuable tool to track the shape and change of what we term the ‘systemic dimension’  of collective identities in network-movements. We show how the 15M movement displays a specific form of systemic collective identity we call ‘multitudinous identity’ , characterized by social transversality and internal heterogeneity, as well as a transient and distributed leadership driven by action initiatives. Our approach attends to the role of distributed interaction and transient leadership at a mesoscale level of organizational dynamics, which may contribute to contemporary discussions of collective identity in network-movements.

Monterde, A., Calleja-López, A., Aguilera, M., Barandiaran, X. E., & Postill, J. (2015). Multitudinous identities: a qualitative and network analysis of the 15M collective identity. Information, Communication and Society, doi: 10.1080/1369118X.2015.1043315

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About maguilera0

Miguel Aguilera is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the IAS Research Center for Life, Mind and Society at the University of the Basque Country. He has been a visiting researcher at the Cognitive Science Program at Indiana University and the Ikegami Lab in the Department of General Systems Studies at the University of Tokyo, and a postdoctoral fellow at the University of the University of Zaragoza and the University of the Balearic Islands. His research focuses on autonomy in biological and social systems from an interdisciplinary perspective, integrating insights from cognitive science, theoretical neuroscience, computational modeling, adaptive behaviour, and complex systems. It combines nonlinear and dynamical models, evolutionary algorithms, and mathematical analysis from dynamical systems, network and information theory, to generate and understand situated and embodied models of agency in the realms of artificial life and evolutionary robotics, computational neuroscience, collective intelligence practices and socio-technical systems.
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